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Did any of you get the chance to read the book before the script (or at least before filming)? If so, was anything exactly how you imagined it?

30 Days of Marvel | Favorite Quote
↳ "We are a boatful of monsters and miracles, hoping that, somehow, we can survive a world in which all hands are against us. A world which, by all evidence, will end extremely soon. Yet I posit we are in a universe which favours stories. A universe in which no story can ever truly end; in which there can only be continuances." 

1602 ~ Neil Gaiman & Andy Kubert. A Marvel universe Elizabethan AU, basically.

My local comic book guy recommended this to me while I was waiting for a new issue of Sandman Overture [yeah, yeah, insert a “bi-monthly” joke here] and he pretty much pitched it to me as “Gaiman re-writes the Marvel universe in a historical setting” which sounds just about as awesome as it actually is. It makes for difficult reading as not only is there a new universe to establish but there’s also a lot going on in terms of splintered plots and a vast range of characters (both historical and re-invented Marvel heroes & villains). However, guessing Marvel characters before they’re revealed has become my new favourite game. Kubert’s artwork is beautiful especially when afforded a full page spread and of course Gaiman brings out his magical words (such as this lovely quote above) to make a very enjoyable and geeky read.

The Maze Runner by James Dashner

Never-never

sveltestiletto:

Marge Piercy

Missing is a pain
in everyplace
making a toothache
out of a day.
But to miss something
that never was :
the longest guilt
the regret that comes down
like a fine ash
year after year
is the shadow of what
we did not dare.
All the days that go out
like neglected cigarettes,
the days that dribble away.
How often does love strike?
We turn into ghosts
loitering outside doorways
we imagined entering.
In the lovers’ room
the floor creaks,
dust sifts from the ceiling,
the golden bed has been hauled away
by the dealer
in unused dreams.

My thanks to bisexual-books for bringing this onto my radar because Love in the Time of Global Warming by Francesca Lia Block is a fantastic YA science fiction dystopian novel based on mythology with a female bisexual protagonist. Sounds pretty damn good, right? The bonus is that the first five chapters are currently free on Amazon (US/UK). 
I loved the preview but it doesn’t look like the paperback is available in the UK yet (or even a full kindle version) so if anyone has any news regarding release dates that would be appreciated. For the time being, if you haven’t already and you have the means to do so, I highly recommend reading the preview.

My thanks to bisexual-books for bringing this onto my radar because Love in the Time of Global Warming by Francesca Lia Block is a fantastic YA science fiction dystopian novel based on mythology with a female bisexual protagonist. Sounds pretty damn good, right? The bonus is that the first five chapters are currently free on Amazon (US/UK). 

I loved the preview but it doesn’t look like the paperback is available in the UK yet (or even a full kindle version) so if anyone has any news regarding release dates that would be appreciated. For the time being, if you haven’t already and you have the means to do so, I highly recommend reading the preview.

Released 30/07/14. 
The artwork continues to astound me, just check out the alternate cover by J.H. Williams III. I’m enjoying the narrative too, it’s just such a shame that we have to wait for so long between issues. Bi-monthly apparently means October, March and July, who knew?

Released 30/07/14. 

The artwork continues to astound me, just check out the alternate cover by J.H. Williams III. I’m enjoying the narrative too, it’s just such a shame that we have to wait for so long between issues. Bi-monthly apparently means October, March and July, who knew?

Fallen on Good Times by REWAN TREMETHICK

image

Fallen on Good Times is a noir-fantasy-crime novel (yeah, you read that right) following the adventures of the paranormal detective Laslo Kane. Laslo’s down on his luck, and in desperation, accepts a case that seems to lead him straight to the mob.

So, firstly, I’ll unpack that genre hybrid I threw at you. Noir - rain, trilbies, moonshine; fantasy - ghosts, werewolves, vampires; crime - bribes, mob, and one spectacular death-defying roof chase over a burning warehouse. Now imagine all that served up and twisted with a wry sense of humour, and you’re halfway there. 

A particularly noteworthy aspect of the novel is that despite crime’s convention of an all-male cast there is a pleasing amount of variety in the characters - multiple women, PoC, queer representation, even a positive living-dead representation from a ghost who doesn’t realise he’s a ghost - and each character is integral to the plot, not just there for decoration. 

The plot is smart and unusual; all of the bizarre elements weave together to make a complex ethical dilemma and logical conclusion.The protagonist, Laslo Kane, is completely lovable - funny, smart, and often incredibly outnumbered - and the writing is especially confident for a debut novelist. 

Available on Amazon (UK/US) in kindle & paperback.